Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The Future of Large Print


The popularity of eReaders has decimated the mass paperback market, and several publishers have even abandoned the format. An eReader can display font in any size, so I assumed the next casualty of eBooks would be large print. Not so. Or, at least, not yet. When I received my statement from my large print publisher, I was pleasantly surprised that Murder at Thumb Butte sold as well as the first two books in the Steve Dancy series. How is it that large print in holding its own against the eBook revolution?

I think it has to do with the market for large print books. Whether it’s libraries or direct purchase, the market is seniors. Seniors are not gadget prone and remain attached to the feel and simplicity of a real book. No buttons, no touch screens, no hot links. Books are what seniors have read their entire life and only their children prod them to change. Seniors can’t see the point. They get lost in the story and turn the page without conscious thought, just a motor reflex learned through decades of practice. 

The boomers will probably carry their eReaders into old age, but most of their parents will remain loyal to the printed book.

If you're looking for a senior gift, you might consider one of these large print books.

                      Shopkeeper          Leadville           Murder at 
                                                                        Thumb Butte

The Shopkeeper has sold out its press run, so only used copies are available.

1 comment:

  1. Interesting point. I think you are probably right for the current generation of older readers. I've read that older readers who buy ereaders use the adjustable text size feature for publications like magazines and newspapers, which don't come in large print format. What share of the market that affects, I don't know.

    I've recently moved to a county in California with a large retired population. I've been pleased to find out that the libraries have thousands of westerns. Many, including recent acquisitions, are in large print, which suggests there's still a demand for them.

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